bbook:

In Nicholas Ray’s wonderful film In a Lonely Place, Humphrey Bogart as Dixon Steele says, “A good love scene should be about something else besides love. For instance, this one. Me fixing grapefruit. You sitting over there, dopey, half-asleep. Anyone looking at us could tell we’re in love.” And when it comes to cinematic depictions of the heart’s great affliction, we’ve seen everything from the existential romantic longings that crush our soul, the ecstatically thrilling tales of love that spans lifetimes, the beautiful friendship of soul mates that never fades, and the most brutal and horrific heartbreak that one never fully recovers from. For all the myriad ways love can transpose itself, cinema has offered us portraits that reflect our own unrequited desires and expose the true feelings residing inside us. But of course, any good love story would be incomplete without a soundtrack to linger through it and heighten our most visceral emotions.
SOUNDTRACK FOR AN IMAGINED LOVE STORY.

bbook:

In Nicholas Ray’s wonderful film In a Lonely Place, Humphrey Bogart as Dixon Steele says, “A good love scene should be about something else besides love. For instance, this one. Me fixing grapefruit. You sitting over there, dopey, half-asleep. Anyone looking at us could tell we’re in love.” And when it comes to cinematic depictions of the heart’s great affliction, we’ve seen everything from the existential romantic longings that crush our soul, the ecstatically thrilling tales of love that spans lifetimes, the beautiful friendship of soul mates that never fades, and the most brutal and horrific heartbreak that one never fully recovers from. For all the myriad ways love can transpose itself, cinema has offered us portraits that reflect our own unrequited desires and expose the true feelings residing inside us. But of course, any good love story would be incomplete without a soundtrack to linger through it and heighten our most visceral emotions.

SOUNDTRACK FOR AN IMAGINED LOVE STORY.

Reblogged from BlackBook

Katharine Hepburn in The Philadelphia Story

I have made a decision that I am starting a Thanksgiving weekend tradition of watching The Philadelphia Story.

Reblogged from Arcane ball of fun
hnnhmcgrth:

Anthony Perkins taking a nap between takes on the set of “Psycho”, 1960. 

Weird fact: I saw his son, Elvis Perkins, perform several times this weekend. Didn’t realize the family resemblance until later on Wikipedia. Suddenly all the weird self-isolating neuroses of Elvis Perkins seemed to make a lot more sense. 

hnnhmcgrth:

Anthony Perkins taking a nap between takes on the set of “Psycho”, 1960. 

Weird fact: I saw his son, Elvis Perkins, perform several times this weekend. Didn’t realize the family resemblance until later on Wikipedia. Suddenly all the weird self-isolating neuroses of Elvis Perkins seemed to make a lot more sense. 

Reblogged from Buta Coron
theniftyfifties:

Audrey Hepburn

theniftyfifties:

Audrey Hepburn

Reblogged from The Nifty Fifties
obliteratedheart:

Audrey Hepburn
“she was also the granddaughter of a baron, the daughter of a nazi sympathizer, spent her teens doing ballet to secretly raise money for the dutch resistance against the nazis, and spent her post-film career as a goodwill ambassador of UNICEF, winning the presidential medal of freedom for her efforts.
and history remembers her as pretty.”

obliteratedheart:

Audrey Hepburn

“she was also the granddaughter of a baron, the daughter of a nazi sympathizer, spent her teens doing ballet to secretly raise money for the dutch resistance against the nazis, and spent her post-film career as a goodwill ambassador of UNICEF, winning the presidential medal of freedom for her efforts.

and history remembers her as pretty.”


Audrey Hepburn en pointe.

Audrey Hepburn en pointe.

Reblogged from The Nifty Fifties

ledaintyboudoir:

atomicdollface:

Setting patterns of the stars.

This could be useful if I had a knack for doing my hair. Feel free to use it, anyone else. <3

Reblogged for Bacall obvs.

Reblogged from Ledaintyboudoir

Lauren Bacall’s character, Schatze, says, “I’ve always liked older men… Look at that old fellow what’s-his-name in The African Queen. Absolutely crazy about him.” She is referring to Bacall’s real-life husband, Humphrey Bogart. 

Lauren Bacall’s character, Schatze, says, “I’ve always liked older men… Look at that old fellow what’s-his-name in The African Queen. Absolutely crazy about him.” She is referring to Bacall’s real-life husband, Humphrey Bogart. 

Reblogged from Arcane ball of fun
Reblogged from Strikes Our Fancy
faredisfare:

Jerry Plaucer-Sarna, Lauren Bacall, 1944

faredisfare:

Jerry Plaucer-Sarna, Lauren Bacall, 1944

Procrastination Theatre: December 8, 2012
Wow. Just - wow. Again, I will repeat the feeling of personally identifying with all Katharine Hepburn movies. I will also take this moment to state that I am blown away by James Stewart in this movie. The intensity and urgency of his voice is just an amazing experience. When he sings to her? Amazing. Just - I should watch this like five more times. Katharine Hepburn is luminous and alive and amazing. 

Procrastination Theatre: December 8, 2012

Wow. Just - wow. Again, I will repeat the feeling of personally identifying with all Katharine Hepburn movies. I will also take this moment to state that I am blown away by James Stewart in this movie. The intensity and urgency of his voice is just an amazing experience. When he sings to her? Amazing. Just - I should watch this like five more times. Katharine Hepburn is luminous and alive and amazing.