travelhighlights:

“Snow is inherently nostalgic. It encourages you to travel back and think about your life. I think it’s something about the way it blankets reality, sort of erasing the present one dead pixel at a time. And that makes room for the past”
- The New Yorker

travelhighlights:

“Snow is inherently nostalgic. It encourages you to travel back and think about your life. I think it’s something about the way it blankets reality, sort of erasing the present one dead pixel at a time. And that makes room for the past”

- The New Yorker

Reblogged from Travelling Aloud
bookmania:

La librairie Canadienne de Paris / The Abbey Bookshop, 29 Rue de la Parcheminerie, Paris, France. In 1989, Brian Spence, who hails from Toronto, crossed the Atlantic to bring his Abbey Bookshop to an international audience. The Abbey Bookshop in Paris’s Latin Quarter has for the last twenty years become a cultural epicenter for Canadians, Anglophones and Anglophiles from all corners of the world. Although offering a wide variety of Canadian books, its main attraction is an eclectic collection of over 35,000 titles in English ranging from scholarly to popular literature.

I remember walking past this!

bookmania:

La librairie Canadienne de Paris / The Abbey Bookshop, 29 Rue de la Parcheminerie, Paris, France. In 1989, Brian Spence, who hails from Toronto, crossed the Atlantic to bring his Abbey Bookshop to an international audience. The Abbey Bookshop in Paris’s Latin Quarter has for the last twenty years become a cultural epicenter for Canadians, Anglophones and Anglophiles from all corners of the world. Although offering a wide variety of Canadian books, its main attraction is an eclectic collection of over 35,000 titles in English ranging from scholarly to popular literature.

I remember walking past this!

Reblogged from
projectaperture:

First frost. Sept.19th. Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

projectaperture:

First frost.
Sept.19th.
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Reblogged from maybe edmonton
grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

sbahjification:

neocarleen:

llisbeth-salamanderr:

“Love the fetus, hate the child.”
America makes it near impossible for a woman to stay autonomous—hard to get family planning resources/make the choice of getting an abortion, and harder to get child care support after the baby is born. Leaving women destitute and dependants everywhere.

Look at Canada! Not only do we give almost a full year off, it can be either maternity or paternity. That’s right, daddy can stay home with the baby while the mother goes back to work. And the leave can be also be split between them. For example, the mother could take six months, and then the father could take the other six. Did I also mention that the parent on leave continues to receive pay and is guaranteed their job back?

#I think we make fun of Canadians so much because secretly we want to be them

CANADA WHY ARE YOU SO GOOD AT EVERYTHING UGH

Not everything, but we do this really well. 

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

sbahjification:

neocarleen:

llisbeth-salamanderr:

“Love the fetus, hate the child.”


America makes it near impossible for a woman to stay autonomous—hard to get family planning resources/make the choice of getting an abortion, and harder to get child care support after the baby is born. Leaving women destitute and dependants everywhere.

Look at Canada! Not only do we give almost a full year off, it can be either maternity or paternity. That’s right, daddy can stay home with the baby while the mother goes back to work. And the leave can be also be split between them. For example, the mother could take six months, and then the father could take the other six. Did I also mention that the parent on leave continues to receive pay and is guaranteed their job back?

CANADA WHY ARE YOU SO GOOD AT EVERYTHING UGH

Not everything, but we do this really well. 

beatonna:

oldcanada:

wahnwitzig:

Canadians are apparently lion cubs now.

lol this is too funny not to reblog

this idea was better than the one where the poster was a grown man calling to a bunch of baby carriages thundering towards him

HAHAHAHA

beatonna:

oldcanada:

wahnwitzig:

Canadians are apparently lion cubs now.

lol this is too funny not to reblog

this idea was better than the one where the poster was a grown man calling to a bunch of baby carriages thundering towards him

HAHAHAHA

Reblogged from maybe edmonton
Tags: canada britain
nationalpost:

It’s too Canadian: Man uses skateboard to fend off large cougar in Banff, then feels bad about itBanff is on edge after a cougar attacked a man in his 20s; there have been several other sightings, and parts of the Alberta mountain town are now shut down. The young man, who was walking along a wooded path on Thursday listening to music on his headphones, was able to fend off the cat by swatting it with his skateboard. It’s exceedingly rare for a cougar to go after a human, said Bill Hunt, the national park’s resource conservation manager, who spoke to the Post’s Jen Gerson.Q: How did you become aware of this cougar attack? What happened?A: Our dispatch centre received an anonymous caller reporting contact with a cougar. The fellow was walking along a woody trail between the town of Banff and the industrial compound in Banff and suddenly he was hit from behind and knocked to the ground. He swung around with his elbow and connected with the cougar and later was able to use his skateboard to defend himself, stun the animal and then flee the area.Q: Was this a regular skateboard, or a longboard?A: I believe it was a longboard, yeah.Q: I understand the victim was afraid to come forward, initially?A: Yeah, he felt really bad that he stunned the animal. He was worried that doing that in a national park wasn’t allowed. Certainly, that’s not the case. If you’re defending yourself, that’s entirely appropriate.  More here (Postmedia)

YEAH SUP THIS IS CANADA.

nationalpost:

It’s too Canadian: Man uses skateboard to fend off large cougar in Banff, then feels bad about it
Banff is on edge after a cougar attacked a man in his 20s; there have been several other sightings, and parts of the Alberta mountain town are now shut down. The young man, who was walking along a wooded path on Thursday listening to music on his headphones, was able to fend off the cat by swatting it with his skateboard. It’s exceedingly rare for a cougar to go after a human, said Bill Hunt, the national park’s resource conservation manager, who spoke to the Post’s Jen Gerson.

Q: How did you become aware of this cougar attack? What happened?

A: Our dispatch centre received an anonymous caller reporting contact with a cougar. The fellow was walking along a woody trail between the town of Banff and the industrial compound in Banff and suddenly he was hit from behind and knocked to the ground. He swung around with his elbow and connected with the cougar and later was able to use his skateboard to defend himself, stun the animal and then flee the area.

Q: Was this a regular skateboard, or a longboard?

A: I believe it was a longboard, yeah.

Q: I understand the victim was afraid to come forward, initially?

A: Yeah, he felt really bad that he stunned the animal. He was worried that doing that in a national park wasn’t allowed. Certainly, that’s not the case. If you’re defending yourself, that’s entirely appropriate.  

More here (Postmedia)

YEAH SUP THIS IS CANADA.

Reblogged from National Post
nationalpost:

The astronaut from next door: Canadian Chris Hadfield is quickly becoming the biggest name in space travelBread is a bad idea in space. Bread makes for crumbs and crumbs make for a mess in zero gravity, floating this way and that, and so a Canadian astronaut hankering for a peanut butter and honey sandwich will leave the Wonder behind for us earthbound slobs and reach instead for a fresh vacuum-sealed flour tortilla.“A tortilla can be good for 18 months,” Chris Hadfield explains in a scene from “Chris Hadfield’s Space Kitchen,” the latest video from our man among the stars detailing everyday life aboard the International Space Station.The 53-year-old makes peanut butter and honey sandwiches. In other dispatches, he has brushed his teeth, demonstrated how to clean up a water spill, bubble by bubble, by plucking the distended orbs from mid-air, jammed with Ed Robertson of the Barenaked Ladies, put on a goofy outfit to celebrate Mardi Gras, swapped tweets with William (Captain Kirk) Shatner, dropped a puck from the heavens on Hockey Night in Canada, fixed some space station gizmo of great scientific importance while sending out a daily stream of majestic photographs of the Earth below — the Sahara, the Australian Outback, the blinding lights of Beijing — via Twitter, Facebook, Youtube and Tumblr.

Yeah Chris Hadfield!

nationalpost:

The astronaut from next door: Canadian Chris Hadfield is quickly becoming the biggest name in space travel
Bread is a bad idea in space. Bread makes for crumbs and crumbs make for a mess in zero gravity, floating this way and that, and so a Canadian astronaut hankering for a peanut butter and honey sandwich will leave the Wonder behind for us earthbound slobs and reach instead for a fresh vacuum-sealed flour tortilla.

“A tortilla can be good for 18 months,” Chris Hadfield explains in a scene from “Chris Hadfield’s Space Kitchen,” the latest video from our man among the stars detailing everyday life aboard the International Space Station.

The 53-year-old makes peanut butter and honey sandwiches. In other dispatches, he has brushed his teeth, demonstrated how to clean up a water spill, bubble by bubble, by plucking the distended orbs from mid-air, jammed with Ed Robertson of the Barenaked Ladies, put on a goofy outfit to celebrate Mardi Gras, swapped tweets with William (Captain Kirk) Shatner, dropped a puck from the heavens on Hockey Night in Canada, fixed some space station gizmo of great scientific importance while sending out a daily stream of majestic photographs of the Earth below — the Sahara, the Australian Outback, the blinding lights of Beijing — via Twitter, Facebook, Youtube and Tumblr.

Yeah Chris Hadfield!

Reblogged from National Post
creature0skater:

This is what you find on the side highway when you live in Alberta 

creature0skater:

This is what you find on the side highway when you live in Alberta 

Reblogged from maybe edmonton
maybeedmonton:

Winter scene - Canadian Rockies, Banff, Canada, [before 1942]

GPO where I live right now.

maybeedmonton:

Winter scene - Canadian Rockies, Banff, Canada, [before 1942]

GPO where I live right now.

Reblogged from maybe edmonton
thedailywhat:

Heartwarming Tearjerker of the Day: Ten-year-old Elijah Porter was ecstatic when Canada’s 4x100m relay team won bronze in London.
Then the team was disqualified for running outside the lane, and Elijah, devastated, wanted to help ease the pain for runners Justyn Warner, Gavin Smellie, Jared Connaughton, and Oluseyi Smith.
So he sent them a letter:

Dear Justyn, Gavin, Jarred [sic], and Oluseyi,
I’m Elijah Porter. I’m ten and I live in Newfoundland, Canada. When I heard what happened on Aug. 11, I knew it was wrong. The rules were not right. But, at last, I realized how good you were. We’re Canadians. We persevere. We create better lives for each other. The cold didn’t stop us from living in the north. We didn’t lose the War of 1812. We adapt and survive. We have earned our freedom. Someday, if I become a biologist, if I get rich, and, if I remember, I will donate money to the summer and winter Canadian Olympians. I hope you like the medal!
Elijah Porter

Elijah included with the letter his medal from a soccer clinic sponsored by Tim Hortons.
[deadspin]

thedailywhat:

Heartwarming Tearjerker of the Day: Ten-year-old Elijah Porter was ecstatic when Canada’s 4x100m relay team won bronze in London.

Then the team was disqualified for running outside the lane, and Elijah, devastated, wanted to help ease the pain for runners Justyn Warner, Gavin Smellie, Jared Connaughton, and Oluseyi Smith.

So he sent them a letter:

Dear Justyn, Gavin, Jarred [sic], and Oluseyi,

I’m Elijah Porter. I’m ten and I live in Newfoundland, Canada. When I heard what happened on Aug. 11, I knew it was wrong. The rules were not right. But, at last, I realized how good you were. We’re Canadians. We persevere. We create better lives for each other. The cold didn’t stop us from living in the north. We didn’t lose the War of 1812. We adapt and survive. We have earned our freedom. Someday, if I become a biologist, if I get rich, and, if I remember, I will donate money to the summer and winter Canadian Olympians. I hope you like the medal!

Elijah Porter

Elijah included with the letter his medal from a soccer clinic sponsored by Tim Hortons.

[deadspin]

Reblogged from The Daily What
crsenex:

beatonna:

A lil’ sketch, I made a lil’ comic.  Click the picture to see it.  Check the write up below, for a cartoon I made for the Guardian also!  

oh canada

crsenex:

beatonna:

A lil’ sketch, I made a lil’ comic.  Click the picture to see it.  Check the write up below, for a cartoon I made for the Guardian also!  

oh canada

Reblogged from Buta Coron
maybeedmonton:

It’s Saskatoon season in Edmonton!
“The Cree called the berry misaskatômina. Mis means ‘everywhere.’ The berries were found all over the landspace of Alberta. When the Europeans arrived, they shortened the word to saskatoon. Today, they are called osâskatômina by the Cree…The saskatoon plant has many uses and was used by most of the First Nations and Métis people living in Alberta. They are part of feasts all year long.In the past, the bark was used for arrow shafts, and different parts of the treewere used for medicinal purposes. For example, the inner bark or roots werea remedy for diarrhea.”

I legit picked 60 pounds of these on Sunday.

maybeedmonton:

It’s Saskatoon season in Edmonton!

“The Cree called the berry misaskatômina. Mis means ‘everywhere.’ The berries were found all over the landspace of Alberta. When the Europeans arrived, they shortened the word to saskatoon. Today, they are called osâskatômina by the Cree…The saskatoon plant has many uses and was used by most of the First Nations and Métis people living in Alberta. They are part of feasts all year long.
In the past, the bark was used for arrow shafts, and different parts of the tree
were used for medicinal purposes. For example, the inner bark or roots were
a remedy for diarrhea.”

I legit picked 60 pounds of these on Sunday.

Reblogged from maybe edmonton
maybeedmonton:

Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, 1940.

maybeedmonton:

Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, 1940.

Reblogged from maybe edmonton